The match their lifestyle. Wind energy is

The Midwest stretches from North Dakota to Kentucky, and every corner is jammed with hill and plains, perfect for farming. America’s Breadbasket, home of Twinkies and some of our most special monuments. The Midwest is unique, and needs some specific energy sources to match their lifestyle. Wind energy is good, because it doesn’t take up as much room as solar. Coal is also a good source because of its close proximity and long life. In the Midwest, where there are only hills and plains, the wind blows about 60% of the year. The states need energy, so why not make it clean, and use a renewable energy source? They can harness the relentless wind, and build wind turbines to create energy. Wind turbines are the best renewable energy resource for the Midwest, because it doesn’t take up valuable land. Farmer can farm around the turbines, making the most out of every foot of their land.(Department of Energy) Many farmers also rent their land, so they can sell the leftover energy for money, and help with their expenses. If they can’t sell it, they make a long term investment too, because the wind turbine will significantly lower their energy bill. ¬†People would argue though, that wind turbines are noisy and aren’t pretty. Engineers are currently working on making quieter trubies, and they may even be available in a few years (Phys.org). Also, someone can purchase smaller turbines and place them out of sight if it bothers them to look at it all day. There are also nonrenewable options for people who live in the Midwest. Coal is the best option, because its cheaper and less dangerous than Nuclear energy. Nuclear energy is expensive, and cost about two billion, to nine billion, and only last about ¬†80 years. Coal will also last for about 142 years, which will give us enough time to create, or perfect a better energy source. It may also help, that the Midwest’s neighbor Wyoming creates about 40% of the 70% that the US produces, which lowers shipping prices. Unfortunately, coal creates pollution, which we can only minimize, not stop. We can try to conserve as much energy as possible, and pollution would hopefully go down. Coal may not be the best solution, but it is better than others. Wind energy and coal energy are the best for the Midwest because of their practicality (wind), and its sensibility (coal). If you were a farmer, would you want to give up valuable acres by using solar panels for the same amount of energy you can get with a tenth of the land usage? Would you want to use expensive and dangerously made energy? I don’t know about everyone else, but I know I would go with the practical choice, and use wind turbines and coal as my energy resources if I lived in the Midwest.