In it is a compulsive thing, a

In our world today, we see smart technology everywhere. Computers instead of typewriters, phones instead of letters, downloaded music on iPods instead of records, and many   more. I believe that smart technology is making us dumb because it is a compulsive thing, a constant distraction, you can’t remember things on your own as much anymore, and your brain needs exercise too. Smart technology can be a good thing too because it allows us to spellcheck and communicate in seconds, but to me, it seems like there are more negatives than positives with   smart technology.In the debate Smart Technology Is Making Us Dumb, we hear many good points both for and against the topic. In this debate, Nicholas Carr said, “We use them compulsively. And the research bears this out. The average person with a smartphone will pull out the phone and look at it about 150 times a day. And that breaks down to about six minutes for your every waking hour. The average teenager or 20 — early 20-something -year -old will send or receive about 4,000 text messages a month.” Carr uses statistics to prove how much we use our phones and how compulsive cell phones can get. In an article on CBS News, Luke Burbank said, “I realized all of this a few weeks ago, when my wife asked me, as a sign of love and dedication, if I knew her cell phone number by heart… But of course I couldn’t remember her number, because I’ve never known it. From our first date, she’s been a name in my cell phone. In fact, if you hung me over a pit of live crocodiles I couldn’t remember seven digits in a row anymore. I’ve lost that ability because I don’t need it. The machines do it for me.” To me, this quote is interesting. It really puts things into perspective. People don’t remember each others phone numbers anymore, not necessarily because they’re dumb,  but because you don’t need to anymore. Your phone does it all for you. Another thing with technology is that it’s generally always with us. You always have your phone in your pocket, possibly smart technology in your car, or maybe you wear a smartwatch. At Futurism Media, Chelsea Pullano said, “A side effect of epic proportions has accompanied our ventures into superior technology. We have become inseparable from our computers and, as time goes on, we are relying on them for more and more of our daily cognitive functions. The brain needs exercise. When you don’t use it often enough, your abilities deteriorate.” Pullano said that our brains need exercise, along with other muscles, and I find that a really good point. We don’t usually think about our brains needing much exercise, but when we memorize things, it exercises your brain. As a Diabetic, I have a pump that I would consider “smart technology” because it has  a touch screen and calculates things for you. I think this is really good resource of smart technology for the Diabetic community and it makes taking care of Diabetes so much easier, but in this instance, I think it is making people rely more on smart technology and less on their brains to calculate things, like how many units of insulin you’d need for any amount of carbs. Smart technology can also be positive in many ways. Genevieve Bell and David Weinberger were against the notion in the debate. Bell asked, “Does it mean that every single one of us who uses GPS because we’re directionally challenged is an idiot? Does it mean the fact that I like Microsoft to spell check make me dumb?” She points out that we all use smart technology pretty much every day, even if it isn’t a cell phone. The majority of us use spell check or a GPS so it doesn’t necessarily makes you dumb. In the end, I agree on the notion that smart technology is making us dumb. I think that smart technology can be a good resource for some things, but since they are compulsive and a constant distraction, it is hard to focus on anything but that smart technology. I also think that this causes you to not remember as well because your brain needs exercise, along with the rest of your body.