English Jane Austen Essay

Jane Austen’s writing in terms of marriage for women is viewed as irrelevant to a child of the modern age as the values do not apply in the contemporary society. * However, this foreign notion of marriage being imperative to a 19th century woman’s life evokes an appreciation within the modern audience for the time they live in, re-altering Austen’s writing to be relevant to modern child. Supported by Weldon. “Child you don’t know how lucky you are”. This notion that to “marry was a great prize”(Weldon) for any ‘successful’ woman, is an unfamiliar and irrelevant concept to the modern child. As a modern child the contrasting values between Austen’s context and today, prompt the appreciation the society we live in. * “Marriage was for ever. ” Pg 31 letters to Alice * “I wish Jane success with all my heart” said charlotte referring to a women’s success being derived for matrimony (Jane and Mr. Bingley) * “Women inherited only through their husbands” pg 30 highlights inequality of women and therefore the significance of marriage… * Jane Austen’s context valued marriage which has resulted in her writing being “” irrelevant by the modern child.

Different contexts possess contrasting values that are reshaped over time… * Contrast of emotionalist protagonist Elizabeth Bennet against the rest of the Lydia and … Bennet … emphasises importance of marriage through contrasting values and characterisation. (Emotionalist/rationalist) Importance or literature * Through the guise of “Aunt Fay” Weldon stresses the importance of quality literature as written by Jane Austen. Quality literature, a thing forgotten by the modern day child consequently leaves a child of the modern day recoiling at the thought of reading Weldon. * “You must read Alice, before it’s too late” pg10 Every child can sympathise with Weldon’s speculation on the distractions from appreciating a “good book”. “How can I convince you of the pleasures of a good book, when you have McDonald’s around one corner and An American Werewolf in London around the next? ” pg 9 * -“You slaked your appetite for information, for stories… with the easy tasty substances of the screen in the living room… And now you realise this is not enough. ” Pg 7-8 * Through the extended metaphor the “City of Invention” Weldon evokes vivid imagery of this multi-dimensional city to explain the timeless value of literature to the modern child. Trying to define literature by what it does, not by what it is. ” By experience, not Idea” pg. 11 * Weldon emphasises the timeless significance of literature through contextual contrast, “Millions starving, then and now… man and especially woman, does not live by bread alone: he has to have books” pg 84 * The value of literature is supported by Austen… as an accomplished woman “added by Darcy… must yet add something more substantial, in the improvement of her mind by extensive reading” pg 39 Success

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Success in Pride and Prejudice is constituted by a person’s measure of wealth and status, still relevant in 21st century rendering Jane Austen’s writing timeless. * Look at texts + contexts * What constitutes success is in the value system of Pride and Prejudice is influenced by Austen’s context where wealth and social status are significant values of society. * Men are spoken of in terms of their wealth (property, inheritance and wage), of which often determines their desirability to a woman. Exemplified through the direct speech of Mrs. Bennet upon Mr. Bingley’s arrival “Oh! Single, my dear to be sure!

A single man of large fortune; four or five thousand a year. What a fine thing for our girls! ” pg. 1 * A person’s acquaintances and relations dictate their position in the social hierarchy; Lady Catherine questions Elizabeth on her relations in order to determine her social status “You are a gentlemen’s daughter. But who was your mother? Who are your uncles and aunts? (Chapter 56) * Inequality of women stipulated only chance for social and financial success was through marriage as “women only inherited through their husbands… women were born porn, and stayed poor, and lived only through their husbands’ favour. Pg 30 * Still relevant today in Australia * Measure of success mirrors that of Jane Austen’s context. * Success in a person’s life in the 21st century is still predominately measured by a person’s wealth in that their material possessions display. * Social rank in Australia has is no real equivalent to the social hierarchy that existed in England in the early nineteenth century. Status could be compared to that of the famous and wealthy today. Social groups in a smaller spectrum still greatly value social rank in society. * Women are capable of individual success – own wealth… supported by Weldon’s feminist views

DRAFT: STATEMENT: “A child of the modern age recoils at the idea of reading Jane Austen and, indeed Fay Weldon. ” Marriage Jane Austen depicts marriage for the nineteenth century woman to be imperative throughout her novel Pride and Prejudice. This notion that to “marry was a great prize” for any ‘successful’ woman, is an unfamiliar and irrelevant concept to a child of the modern age, however, contrasting contextual values evoke an appreciation for the society we live in, further supported by Fay Weldon in her epistolary novel Letters to Alice on First Reading Jane Austen.

The patriarchal structure of society of Austen’s context dictated that the only way for social and financial success in a woman’s life was through matrimony. “I wish Jane success with all my heart” said Charlotte Lucas, this utilisation of dialogue in Pride and Prejudice demonstrates that marriage constituted success for women. Progression of the women’s position in society have had lead to alterations of prevailing value systems present in society compared to that of the nineteenth century.

Weldon reinforces this importance of marriage in Austen’s context, and comparably emphasises the contextual gap between Austen’s society and the current world. “Child you don’t know how lucky you are”, Weldon utilises a didactic tone strengthening her assertion. The intrusive manner in which Weldon speaks insinuates that her niece Alice and the children ‘of the modern age’ should be thankful for the context in which they were born. The inclusion of historical information highlights inequality of women and consequently the significance of marriage for women.

Women “inherited only through their husbands” as inheritance in the nineteenth century belonged to the closest male heir a principle abolished in contemporary Australia and in comprehensible to ‘a child of the modern age’. As a child of the twenty first century in Australia, it is evident Austen’s context valued marriage, which has resulted in her writing being labeled irrelevant by such audiences as myself. Though her writing reveals values of marriage from a different context this contrast of Pride and Prejudice that of my own formulates an appreciation for the time I live in. A child of the modern age recoils at the idea of reading Jane Austen’ due to the disparity in values. On the contrary this difference of values experienced through Austen’s writing renders her relevant to the modern child as they gain an appreciation for the context they live. Importance of Literature Letters to Alice on First Reading Jane Austen’s author Fay Weldon articulates the importance of quality Literature to the modern child through the guise of “Aunt Fay”, a value lost through generations of social and technological advancement.

Weldon’s utilises a didactic tone to stress the significance of Literature “with a capital ‘L’” as written by Jane Austen “as opposed to just books”. “You must read Alice, before it’s too late” emphasises the imperativeness of Literature. As a ‘child of the modern age’ I can sympathise with Weldon’s speculation on the distractions from appreciating a “good book”. “How can I convince you… when you have McDonald’s around one corner and An American Werewolf in London around the next? ” Weldon’s rhetorical question prompts the audience to contemplate their individual participation in the dismissal of literature.

Through the extended metaphor of the “City of Invention” Weldon evokes vivid imagery of this multi-dimensional city to explain the timeless value of quality literature to the modern child by “trying to define literature by what it does, not by what it is. ” By experience, not Idea. ” Weldon highlights the timeless gravity of literature through contextual contrast, “Millions starving, then and now… man and especially woman, does not live by bread alone: he has to have books”. This demonstrates the momentous value in which literature has been held throughout time, that it is imperative to human life.

The value of literature is supported by Austen as an accomplished woman “added by Darcy… must yet add something more substantial, in the improvement of her mind by extensive reading”. The concept of quality literature is a value neglected by a child of the modern age due to the influences of a globalised society resulting in Weldon’s writing being irrelevant leaving a child of the modern day recoiling at the thought of reading Fay Weldon. Success Jane Austen established wealth and status to be components that constitute success in her 1813 novel Pride and Prejudice.

These values are still applicable in twenty-first century Australia rendering Jane Austen’s writing timeless. Men are spoken of in regards of their wealth, of which determines their desirability to a woman. This notion is exemplified through the direct speech of Mrs. Bennet upon Mr. Bingley’s arrival “Oh!… A single man of large fortune; four or five thousand a year. What a fine thing for our girls! ” she thinks Mr. Bingley very desirable a husband solely because of his wealth indicating success.

Austen’s value of social status is influenced by her context, as in England in the early eighteen hundreds a person’s acquaintances and relations dictate their position in the social hierarchy. Lady Catherine questions Elizabeth on her relations in order to determine her social status “You are a gentlemen’s daughter. But who was your mother? Who are your uncles and aunts? Inequality of women stipulated only chance for social and financial success was through marriage as “women only inherited through their husbands… women were born porn, and stayed poor, and lived only through their husbands’ favour. Correspondingly, contemporary societal values have remained constant throughout developing contexts. Feminist movements during the nineteen hundreds has lead to the progression of women’s status in society enabling a woman’s success to be determined through the same values as a mans. The constitution of success is of Pride and Prejudice is influenced by Austen’s context where wealth and social status are significant in the value system of society. The measure of success in the current society parallels that of the nineteenth century, though the stipulation of gender has developed resulting in a more egalitarian society.

Marriage Jane Austen depicts marriage for the nineteenth century woman to be imperative throughout her novel Pride and Prejudice. This notion that to “marry was a great prize” for any ‘successful’ woman, is an unfamiliar and irrelevant concept to a child of the modern age. However, contrasting contextual values prompt an appreciation within ‘the modern child’ for the society we now live in, this is further supported by Fay Weldon in her epistolary novel Letters to Alice on First Reading Jane Austen.

The patriarchal structure of society present in Austen’s context dictates that the only way for social and financial success in a woman’s life was through matrimony. “I wish Jane success with all my heart” said Charlotte Lucas referring to Mr. Bingley’s attentions to Jane in which matrimony could secure Jane’s success. The utilisation of dialogue in Pride and Prejudice substantiates that marriage constitutes success for women. Marriage “was a woman’s aim”. Austen devised a female protagonist that contradicted the social conventions of women for her time portraying beliefs of her own.

The value of emotionalism in marriage is portrayed through her protagonist “Miss Elizabeth Bennet” who disagrees that “happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance”. Weldon explains, Austen “believed it was better to not marry at all, than to marry without love”… “Such notions were quite new” they swam “against the stream of communal ideas” that typified her time. Aunt Fay explains to Alice, Austen “left a legacy for the future to build upon” in which we should be thankful.

The progression of women’s position in society over time has led to alterations in the prevailing value systems present. Weldon emphasises the contextual gap between Austen’s world and the current society highlighting the variation in the value of marriage. “It is the stuff of our magazines”, “Aunt Fay” explains “but it was the stuff of their life, their very existence”, accentuating the variation in the significance of marriage. “Child you don’t know how lucky you are” Weldon affirms in a didactic tone to strengthen her assertion.

The intrusive manner in which Weldon speaks insinuates that Alice and the children ‘of the modern age’ should be appreciative for the context in which they were born as marriage is not the primary concern of their life as was in the nineteenth century. ‘A child of the modern age recoils at the idea of reading Jane Austen’ due to the disparity in values. As a child of the twenty first century in Australia, this difference of values experienced through Austen’s writing and further supported by Weldon prompts readers such as myself to appreciate the context in which we live and realise the significance of Austen’s writing.

The contrasting contextual value of marriage presented in Austen’s novel Pride and Prejudice renders her writing relevant to the ‘modern’ child. Importance of Literature Letters to Alice on First Reading Jane Austen’s author Fay Weldon articulates the importance of quality literature to the modern child through the guise of the character “Aunt Fay”, a value lost through generations of social change and technological advancement. Weldon’s utilises a didactic tone to stress the significance of Literature “with a capital ‘L’” as written by Jane Austen “as opposed to just books”. You must read Alice, before it’s too late” emphasises the imperativeness of literature. As a ‘child of the modern age’ one can sympathise with Weldon’s speculation on the distractions from appreciating a “good book”. “How can I convince you… when you have McDonald’s around one corner and An American Werewolf in London around the next? ” Weldon’s rhetorical question prompts the audience to contemplate their individual participation in the dismissal of literature.

Through the extended metaphor of the “City of Invention” Weldon engages the reader in the multi-dimensional city “trying to define literature by what it does, not by what it is. By experience, not Idea” revealing the timeless value of quality literature unknown to her niece Alice, a modern child of the late twentieth century. Weldon highlights the timeless gravity of literature through contextual contrast, “millions starving, then and now… man and especially woman, does not live by bread alone: he has to have books”.

This demonstrates the momentous value in which literature has been held throughout time, that it is imperative to human life. The value of literature is supported by Austen as an accomplished woman “added by Darcy… must yet add something more substantial, in the improvement of her mind by extensive reading”. The concept of quality literature is a value neglected by a child of the modern age due to the influences of a globalised society resulting in Weldon’s writing is labeled irrelevant to them.

Weldon’s language itself is difficult, understanding comes with further reading leaving ‘a child of the modern age’ recoiling at the thought of reading Fay Weldon. Success Jane Austen established wealth and status to be components that constitute success in her 1813 novel Pride and Prejudice. These values are still applicable in the evaluation of success in twenty-first century Australia rendering Jane Austen’s writing timeless. Men are spoken of in regards of their wealth, of which determines their desirability to a woman. This notion is exemplified through the direct speech of Mrs.

Bennet upon Mr. Bingley’s arrival “Oh!… A single man of large fortune; four or five thousand a year. What a fine thing for our girls! ” Mrs. Bennet thinks Mr. Bingley a very desirable husband solely for the reason of his wealth indicating success. Austen’s value of social status is influenced by her context, as in England in the early eighteen hundreds a person’s acquaintances and relations dictate their position in the rigid social hierarchy. Lady Catherine questions Elizabeth Bennet on her relations in order to determine her social status, “You are a gentlemen’s daughter.

But who was your mother? Who are your uncles and aunts? ” The inequality of women stipulated that the only chance for social and financial success was through marriage as “women only inherited through their husbands… women were born poor, and stayed poor, and lived only through their husbands’ favour. ” Correspondingly, contemporary societal values have remained constant throughout developing contexts. Feminist movements during the nineteen hundreds has led to the progression of women’s status in society enabling a woman’s success to be determined through the same values as a mans.

The constitution of success in Pride and Prejudice is influenced by Austen’s context, where wealth and social status are significant aspects in the value system of their society. The measure of success in the twenty first century Australian society parallels that of the nineteenth century in England. Though the specification of gender has modified resulting in a developing egalitarian society, where success for women is increasingly attainable and measured in regards to their wealth and status alike a mans’.